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About the Author

Adriankoto Ratozamana
Cyber activist, eco-entrepreneur, citizen journalist (Antananarivo, MADAGASCAR)

Harinjaka Andriankoto RATOZAMANANA is a blogger, Observer, TH!NKer and Successful entrepreneur based in Antananarivo. In 2007 his work caught the attention of senior management at TED.com (Technology, Entertainment and Design) which offered him a global fellowship recognizing his role as “...an outstanding young developing world leader who has demonstrated outstanding achievement and potential...” (see “Fellows” at www.ted.com). Presently Harinjaka works on different projects that combines social goals, conservation, and for-profit objectives in Madagascar. As a stringer for France 24, he covers breaking news events in sub-Saharan Africa. He is also part of www.vakanala.org team. A Malagasy non profit organisation, with technologists and local development specialists in reaction to the obvious urgent need to preserve biodiversity hotspots in Madagascar and to engage in local development. http://www.vakanala.org/en/donate

Post

$1 Million Bed, made out of Madagascar forest degradation.

Published 28th October 2010 - 1 comments - 9420 views -

Illegal logging in Madagascar is causing environmental damage and contributing to climate change. The annual rate of forest loss in Madagascar is now estimated three times higher than that of Indonesia.

Since June 2009, Global Witness and the Environmental Investigation Agency (EIA) have been contracted by Madagascar National Parks (MNP) to investigate the illegal harvesting and trade of ebony, pallisander and rosewood, which spiked dramatically following the political coup in Madagascar. Consumer demand for rosewood furniture and musical instruments is driving illegal logging in Madagascar's national parks, endangering wildlife and undermining local community livelihoods, according to this new report.

The document shows that Madagascar's valuable hardwoods are being illegally harvested from rainforest parks and trafficked to Asia, Europe, and the United States. The vast majority of timber—98 percent—however ends up in China, where it is converted into luxury furniture.

 

One piece of furniture made of the illegal wood, a bed, has been found on the market in China for 1 million dollars.

Valuable timber has been exploited from Madagascar’s rainforests for many decades, and Malagasy rosewood, ebony and palissandre are among the most sought after hardwoods in the world. Large quantities have been harvested and exported at an increasing rate, almost entirely from illegal logging in protected areas

"Madagascar's natural assets are being stripped to feed a ready network of international buyers," said Reiner Tegtmeyer of Global Witness. "We first exposed the scale of this problem in October last year but the plunder shows little sign of slowing."

Full report:
Investigation Into The Global Trade in Malagasy Precious Woods:
Rosewood, Ebony and Pallisander
http://apsaracreative.com/~clients/EIA/EIA_GW_Madagascar_Eng_P05_low.pdf

photo: Environmental Investigation Agency


Category: Trade | Tags: china, deforestation, redd, global witness,


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